Introduction

Originally, goulash was a shepherd’s stew of the Magyars, a people living in Eastern Europe, mainly in the Pannonian plains of Hungary. From there, it started its triumphal march into the world. In Hungary, the term “goulash” is used for soups containing solid ingredients such as noodles, vegetables, or meat cubes. What the rest of the world calls “goulash”, in Hungary is called “paprikas” or “pörkölt”.

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Szeged Goulash


Description

Originally, goulash was a shepherd’s stew of the Magyars, a people living in Eastern Europe, mainly in the Pannonian plains of Hungary. From there, it started its triumphal march into the world. In Hungary, the term “goulash” is used for soups containing solid ingredients such as noodles, vegetables, or meat cubes. What the rest of the world calls “goulash”, in Hungary is called “paprikas” or “pörkölt”.


Scale

Ingredients

Ingredients:

  • 2 lbs beef chuck, cut into 1 inch cubes
  • 1 lb lean veal, cut into 1 inch cubes (optional)
  • 1/4 c vegetable oil or bacon drippings
  • 1 1/2 c chopped onions
  • 1  to 1 1/2 c boiling beef or tomato stock (or a mixture of the two)
  • 1 diced green pepper, diced (remove seeds and membrane)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp paprika (sweet Hungarian if possible)

Instructions

Recipe:

Melt the oil or bacon drippings in a medium heavy pot.

Brown the meat on all sides.  Add the chopped onions and saute until transparent.

Add 1 c stock, green pepper, salt and paprika

Bring the pot up to a simmer and cover partially.  Allow the goulash to simmer for about 1 1/2 hours.

Taste and season as needed with salt and/or pepper.


SchnitzelGirl

SchnitzelGirl

Head Cook

 I’ve always loved cooking, and spent many years working on the food & beverage side of the hospitality industry, which served to increase my interest in food, wine and entertaining. 

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